National Grange President’s April Message

We’ve entered into the month of April and you know what that means; GRANGE MONTH! National Grange President Ed Luttrell lets us know that Grange Month is not only good for Granges, but for everyone involved!

National Grange President’s March Message

This month National Grange President Ed Luttrell talks about how you should prepare for spring, the upcoming Grange Month, and the importance of growing your Grange.

Grange releases “The Early Granges of New York State: The First 10 Years” as an exclusive e-book to the Amazon Kindle Store

EGofNYWASHINGTON, D.C. – On Mar. 13, the National Grange released “The Early Granges of New York State: The First 10 Years” as a Kindle download available through Amazon’s Kindle Store.

Originally published in 1992, the book documents the difficulty the Granges in New York State faced during their first 10 years.

“William Benson has written a phenomenal account of the hardships these Granges in New York were presented with,” National Grange President Ed Luttrell said Thursday. “By utilizing member accounts and written works of that time, Mr. Benson paints a vivid picture of how many of these Granges struggled, yet ultimately succeeded due to hard work and perseverance.”

Luttrell said the book is as important as it ever was because the lessons learned by those Granges are still valuable today.

“The good times and the bad, the challenges faced, the successes and failures, everything the members faced, is recounted. “Luttrell said. “Most of this story is told through the words of the officers and delegates at the annual State Sessions during those years. Everything feels genuine.”

The National Grange has signed a 90-day exclusivity deal for “The Early Granges of New York State: The First 10 Years” with Amazon and the Amazon Kindle Store. The e-book will be added to the Barnes and Noble Nook Store after the exclusivity deal expires.

This is the thirteenth e-book the National Grange has released. Previous releases include “Mentor in the Grange,” “Semi-Centennial History of the Patrons of Husbandry,” “Origin and Progress of the Order of the Patrons of Husbandry in the United States,” “Agriculture and Progress: The Farmers Great Awakening,” “The Granger Movement in New England,” “Friend of the Farmer,” “Legal and Economic Influence of the Grange,” “Notes and Quotes,” “Proud Heritage,” “First Century of Service,” “People, Pride and Progress,” and the “2014 National Grange Digest of Laws.”

“These books tell a very interesting history of the American people, spirit and culture,” Luttrell said.

Luttrell said the organization continues to seek treasures like Benson’s book that tell the story of the Grange in communities and states throughout the nation as it prepares to celebrate its 150 anniversary in 2017. Any authors wishing to share their work with the Grange should contact National Grange Communications Director Amanda Leigh Brozana by email at abrozana@nationalgrange.org or by calling (888) 4-GRANGE ext. 102.

 “The Early Grange of New York State: The First 10 Years” is available as an e-book for $2.99.  BUY IT NOW.

 Established in 1867, The National Grange, a nonpartisan, nonprofit fraternal organization, is the oldest agricultural and rural community service organization. With more than 2,100 local chapters, the Grange has evolved into the nation’s leading rural advocacy organization and a major benefactor to local communities. There are more than 160,000 members across the United States.

 

National Grange President’s February Message

National Grange President Ed Luttrell lets you know what he thinks is the most important holiday in February and why every member needs to do their part to grow the Grange

National Grange happy to see Farm Bill passes House

2014FARMBILLIMAGEWASHINGTON, D.C. – On Wednesday, Jan. 29, the House passed the five-year comprehensive Farm Bill package proposed by the bipartisan Farm Bill conference committee on Monday, Jan. 27. The Farm Bill now goes to the Senate for a full vote and then to President Obama for his signature, a process that legislators and agricultural groups hope to see completed no later than next week.

Now two years overdue, American agriculture has patiently waited for legislators to reach an agreement on the nearly $1 trillion piece of legislation that funds American agricultural programs through 2018, National Grange Legislative Director Grace Boatright said Wednesday.

“American agriculture has withstood uncertainty and economic instability for over two years in the absence of a renewed comprehensive Farm Bill. They’ve been unable to make valuable, long-term decisions regarding their businesses and unable to grant their households and local communities the resources they require to move forward. Today, however, we are happy to see that the needs of farmers and ranchers across the country – and the millions of people who benefit from their work – are being made a priority.” Boatright said.

The bill passed the House by a vote of 251-166, giving reassurance to Senate Agriculture Committee Chairwoman Debbie Stabenow that the legislation could pass her chamber by next week.

The 949-page Farm Bill saves nearly $23 billion over a 10-year period, a third of which comes from the Nutrition Title that funds the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). Other savings are reached through the elimination of the direct payment system. The Grange will be watching this issue closely as the bill works its way through the Senate.

Established in 1867, The National Grange, a nonpartisan, nonprofit fraternal organization, is the oldest agricultural and rural community service organization. With more than 2,100 local chapters, the Grange has evolved into the nation’s leading rural advocacy organization and a major benefactor to local communities. There are more than 160,000 members across the United States.

National Grange President says Obama touts willingness to ‘overstep’ Presidential Authority

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Edward L. Luttrell, National Grange President

WASHINGTON, D.C. (January 28, 2014) — National Grange President Edward L. Luttrell, on Tuesday evening, reacted to President Barack Obama’s fifth State of the Union Address, saying “this President has overstepped the authority provided to the office by the Constitution, and tonight he presented a platform that runs in many ways in direct opposition to fundamental principles of our democratic republic.”

The Grange, America’s oldest standing agriculture advocacy organization, has since its founding in 1867 been a nonpartisan voice for rural Americans and farmers.

“The Grange’s structure is similar to that established by America’s forefathers.  Delegates represent the members of their state and from the concerns of those members and their own conscience, determine our policy, our laws.  The president does not make them but instead carries out the will of the people,” Luttrell said. “Maybe Mr. Obama should walk across Pennsylvania Avenue, through Lafayette Square and to our Grange Headquarters to learn what the role of a president is rather than tell lawmakers that he alone will attempt to solve problems without their consent.  Mr. Obama, you are welcome anytime at a Grange meeting – all of which are conducted in nonpartisan fashion and tolerate open debate – where we teach young and old about their role in our democracy, and we would be happy to the roles of citizens and elected officials in our government.”

Established in 1867, The National Grange, a nonpartisan, nonprofit fraternal organization, is the oldest agricultural and rural community service organization. With more than 2,100 local chapters, the Grange has evolved into the nation’s leading rural advocacy organization and a major benefactor to local communities. There are more than 160,000 members across the United States.

National Grange President’s January Message

The National Grange wants to wish everyone a Happy New Year! In his January message, National Grange President Ed Luttrell talks about the importance of new members and the effect it has on getting Granges and the community!

National Grange seeks volunteers to preserve history

charterbook2WASHINGTON, D.C. — The National Grange is beginning a large project focused on preserving the organization’s 146-year history and is seeking volunteers to assist.

“We are scanning, photographing and otherwise capturing many of the vast collection of our records in an effort to make sure this history isn’t lost,” National Grange Communications Director Amanda Leigh Brozana said. “It’s a huge undertaking and will take much more than just our staff to complete even a portion of this project before our 150th Anniversary in 2017.”

Some of the many documents being captured include the Journal of Proceedings dating back to 1873, minutes from the Assembly of Demeter dating back to 1893, Juvenile Grange Quarterly reports records and charter books.

Brozana said the project will require hundreds of volunteer hours from dedicated Grange members and history buffs others interested in the organization, but, she said “practically anyone with a computer and internet connection can help.”

Volunteers will be provided PDFs, JPGs or text documents of historical records as well as Excel spreadsheets for some. Those preserving things such as Sixth and Seventh Degree records will be asked to look at the original files and put the information into the specified fields of the spreadsheet.  Others who are assisting in the digitization of Journal of Proceedings and other books will be given text documents and provided the original book to make sure all materials transcribed by a computer program is accurate.  The documents will then be turned into e-books.

“Many of our records are handwritten, so it’s impossible to allow a computer program to translate them.  When you look back, though, the history is engrossing and you can see all the possibilities of how it can engage our members and the descendants of our members” Brozana said.

Anyone interested in assisting can contact Brozana by email at abrozana@nationalgrange.org.

Chinese Government Officials Visit the National Grange

Grace and groupThe Grange is truly an American organization from its democratic elections through its grassroots nature. Because of that, many foreign dignitaries and scholars are often interested in the Grange. Through a connection with the State Department, for the second time in the past few years, the National Grange staff hosted sixteen Chinese Government officials from China’s Gansu province.

On Dec. 12th, the officials were introduced to National Grange President Ed Luttrell before meeting with the National Grange’s Legislative Director, Grace Boatright to discuss American agriculture and the role of the National Grange. The Chinese Government officials included, regulators, technology promoters and technical staff. Boatright began the discussion by explaining the history of the Grange, how it functions and the kinds of issues Grangers care about that Boatright advocates for on the Hill.

“We enjoyed having our Chinese visitors here at the Grange building to discuss the state of American agriculture and the Grange’s involvement in creating agricultural policy,” Boatright said. The Chinese officials had many questions of their own on topics that ranged from the Farm Bill to China’s trade partnership with the U.S. “China is quickly becoming a prime trading partner as their middle class continues to expand, creating more demand for U.S. agricultural goods. The better we understand each other, the easier it will be to reach that market,” said Boatright.

National Master reaffirms Grange’s ag policies in speech

Ed_addressOn Tuesday, November 12th during the Opening Session of the 147th Annual Convention National Grange Master, Ed Luttrell delivered his sixth annual address. For the first time the Master’s Annual Address was broadcast via Live-Stream to a world-wide audience and Grangers from around the country listened in. The speech was recorded and views continued to climb toward one thousand views as of Wednesday afternoon.

Lutrell’s greeting was passionate and his excitement about the National Grange returning to New Hampshire was evident.

“For the past 146 years, the Grange has focused on educating and teaching our members how to make their lives, and the communities they call home, better. We have helped generations of Americans to improve their lives through practical application of the lessons taught throughout the Order. In the Process, we have many times also changed America for the better.”

The Grange’s primary focus on agriculture was prominent in Master Luttrell’s speech. He mentioned the Farm Bill, GMO’s and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). He demanded that elected officials “Pass a Farm Bill now!” and received a loud applause from the audience. He suggested that Congress separate the SNAP program from the Farm Bill or resolve the impasses they are facing. He lastly mentioned GMO’s and the National Grange’s policy to support all forms of agriculture.

Master Lutrell then passionately spoke about the country’s financial situation, he encouraged the government to handle the country’s money like an individual family and not spend more than they bring in. Master Lutrell then called on all Grangers to put aside partisanship and elect the most responsible officials possible, who will spend money wisely.