National Grange President’s April Message

We’ve entered into the month of April and you know what that means; GRANGE MONTH! National Grange President Ed Luttrell lets us know that Grange Month is not only good for Granges, but for everyone involved!

National Grange President’s March Message

This month National Grange President Ed Luttrell talks about how you should prepare for spring, the upcoming Grange Month, and the importance of growing your Grange.

Grange releases “The Early Granges of New York State: The First 10 Years” as an exclusive e-book to the Amazon Kindle Store

EGofNYWASHINGTON, D.C. – On Mar. 13, the National Grange released “The Early Granges of New York State: The First 10 Years” as a Kindle download available through Amazon’s Kindle Store.

Originally published in 1992, the book documents the difficulty the Granges in New York State faced during their first 10 years.

“William Benson has written a phenomenal account of the hardships these Granges in New York were presented with,” National Grange President Ed Luttrell said Thursday. “By utilizing member accounts and written works of that time, Mr. Benson paints a vivid picture of how many of these Granges struggled, yet ultimately succeeded due to hard work and perseverance.”

Luttrell said the book is as important as it ever was because the lessons learned by those Granges are still valuable today.

“The good times and the bad, the challenges faced, the successes and failures, everything the members faced, is recounted. “Luttrell said. “Most of this story is told through the words of the officers and delegates at the annual State Sessions during those years. Everything feels genuine.”

The National Grange has signed a 90-day exclusivity deal for “The Early Granges of New York State: The First 10 Years” with Amazon and the Amazon Kindle Store. The e-book will be added to the Barnes and Noble Nook Store after the exclusivity deal expires.

This is the thirteenth e-book the National Grange has released. Previous releases include “Mentor in the Grange,” “Semi-Centennial History of the Patrons of Husbandry,” “Origin and Progress of the Order of the Patrons of Husbandry in the United States,” “Agriculture and Progress: The Farmers Great Awakening,” “The Granger Movement in New England,” “Friend of the Farmer,” “Legal and Economic Influence of the Grange,” “Notes and Quotes,” “Proud Heritage,” “First Century of Service,” “People, Pride and Progress,” and the “2014 National Grange Digest of Laws.”

“These books tell a very interesting history of the American people, spirit and culture,” Luttrell said.

Luttrell said the organization continues to seek treasures like Benson’s book that tell the story of the Grange in communities and states throughout the nation as it prepares to celebrate its 150 anniversary in 2017. Any authors wishing to share their work with the Grange should contact National Grange Communications Director Amanda Leigh Brozana by email at abrozana@nationalgrange.org or by calling (888) 4-GRANGE ext. 102.

 “The Early Grange of New York State: The First 10 Years” is available as an e-book for $2.99.  BUY IT NOW.

 Established in 1867, The National Grange, a nonpartisan, nonprofit fraternal organization, is the oldest agricultural and rural community service organization. With more than 2,100 local chapters, the Grange has evolved into the nation’s leading rural advocacy organization and a major benefactor to local communities. There are more than 160,000 members across the United States.

 

County farmers question new agricultural regulations, changes

BY JEN BONDESON | FREDERICK NEWS POST

52f72ca4d8395.preview-300Frederick County farmers told federal, state and local elected officials Saturday that they can’t take any more regulations.

About 100 farmers and agriculture leaders attended the Annual Legislative Day for agriculture, hosted by the Catoctin and Frederick Soil Conservation District, Frederick County Farm Bureau, and Frederick County Pomona Grange at the New Midway Fire Hall just north of Woodsboro.

Regulation and taxes, as always, were the biggest issues the farmers shared throughout the day, said Charles Brault, president of the Frederick County Farm Bureau.

County Commissioners gave updates on new storm water management requirements and impact fees. Farm owners are held to the same standards as developers for both. They must manage the water flowing off their buildings and other impervious services, and must pay impact fees when developing portions of their land.

Read the full story here.

Soup Bowl feeds about 75 people

BY SUSAN MEEKER | GLENN COUNTY TRANSCRIPT

Bob Pasero, left, dishes up a steamy bowl of navy bean soup for longtime Orland resident Kay Larsen at the fourth annual Soup Bowl on Saturday.

Bob Pasero, left, dishes up a steamy bowl of navy bean soup for longtime Orland resident Kay Larsen at the fourth annual Soup Bowl on Saturday.

The day before Super Bowl XLVIII was officially known as “No Cook Saturday” in Orland.

The Victory in Christ Community Church hosted its fourth annual Soup Bowl, feeding about 75 people lunch at no charge.

The Soup Bowl was held in the basement of the Grange Hall.

“The soup was great,” said Kristy Rumble. “I started at one end and didn’t stop until I tasted each one.”

The annual Soup Bowl featured more than a half-dozen soups and desserts and was planned to coincide with the annual Orland Fire Department’s Spaghetti Feed.

Read the full story here.

National Grange President’s February Message

National Grange President Ed Luttrell lets you know what he thinks is the most important holiday in February and why every member needs to do their part to grow the Grange

National Grange happy to see Farm Bill passes House

2014FARMBILLIMAGEWASHINGTON, D.C. – On Wednesday, Jan. 29, the House passed the five-year comprehensive Farm Bill package proposed by the bipartisan Farm Bill conference committee on Monday, Jan. 27. The Farm Bill now goes to the Senate for a full vote and then to President Obama for his signature, a process that legislators and agricultural groups hope to see completed no later than next week.

Now two years overdue, American agriculture has patiently waited for legislators to reach an agreement on the nearly $1 trillion piece of legislation that funds American agricultural programs through 2018, National Grange Legislative Director Grace Boatright said Wednesday.

“American agriculture has withstood uncertainty and economic instability for over two years in the absence of a renewed comprehensive Farm Bill. They’ve been unable to make valuable, long-term decisions regarding their businesses and unable to grant their households and local communities the resources they require to move forward. Today, however, we are happy to see that the needs of farmers and ranchers across the country – and the millions of people who benefit from their work – are being made a priority.” Boatright said.

The bill passed the House by a vote of 251-166, giving reassurance to Senate Agriculture Committee Chairwoman Debbie Stabenow that the legislation could pass her chamber by next week.

The 949-page Farm Bill saves nearly $23 billion over a 10-year period, a third of which comes from the Nutrition Title that funds the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). Other savings are reached through the elimination of the direct payment system. The Grange will be watching this issue closely as the bill works its way through the Senate.

Established in 1867, The National Grange, a nonpartisan, nonprofit fraternal organization, is the oldest agricultural and rural community service organization. With more than 2,100 local chapters, the Grange has evolved into the nation’s leading rural advocacy organization and a major benefactor to local communities. There are more than 160,000 members across the United States.

Grange Month 2014

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The National Grange of the Order of Patrons of Husbandry is proud to be celebrating 146 years of service to America.

As we celebrate our history, we are positive and enthused about our future and every Community Grange will open their doors to their community with pride.

Note: There will be no physical Grange Month mailing this year but material will be available for you to download. More Grange Month information and material will become available soon with everything available for download by Feb. 1.

 

Download your 2014 Grange Month Material.

Grange Month Poster (letter size)

Grange Month Poster (11 x 17 size)

Grange Month Poster (18 x 22 size)

Grange Month Order Form

National Grange President says Obama touts willingness to ‘overstep’ Presidential Authority

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Edward L. Luttrell, National Grange President

WASHINGTON, D.C. (January 28, 2014) — National Grange President Edward L. Luttrell, on Tuesday evening, reacted to President Barack Obama’s fifth State of the Union Address, saying “this President has overstepped the authority provided to the office by the Constitution, and tonight he presented a platform that runs in many ways in direct opposition to fundamental principles of our democratic republic.”

The Grange, America’s oldest standing agriculture advocacy organization, has since its founding in 1867 been a nonpartisan voice for rural Americans and farmers.

“The Grange’s structure is similar to that established by America’s forefathers.  Delegates represent the members of their state and from the concerns of those members and their own conscience, determine our policy, our laws.  The president does not make them but instead carries out the will of the people,” Luttrell said. “Maybe Mr. Obama should walk across Pennsylvania Avenue, through Lafayette Square and to our Grange Headquarters to learn what the role of a president is rather than tell lawmakers that he alone will attempt to solve problems without their consent.  Mr. Obama, you are welcome anytime at a Grange meeting – all of which are conducted in nonpartisan fashion and tolerate open debate – where we teach young and old about their role in our democracy, and we would be happy to the roles of citizens and elected officials in our government.”

Established in 1867, The National Grange, a nonpartisan, nonprofit fraternal organization, is the oldest agricultural and rural community service organization. With more than 2,100 local chapters, the Grange has evolved into the nation’s leading rural advocacy organization and a major benefactor to local communities. There are more than 160,000 members across the United States.

National Grange President’s January Message

The National Grange wants to wish everyone a Happy New Year! In his January message, National Grange President Ed Luttrell talks about the importance of new members and the effect it has on getting Granges and the community!